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More Rhyming Books

“The Measured Mom”    blog shares five ways that rhyming stories and songs benefit children.

  1. Rhyming teaches children how language works. It helps them notice and work with the sounds within words.
  2. Rhymes help children experience the rhythm of language.
  3. When children are familiar with a nursery rhyme or rhyming book, they learn to anticipate the rhyming word.  This prepares them to make predictions when they read, another important rhyming skill.
  4. It can help children understand that words that share common sounds often share common sounds with common letters.
  5. When listening to rhyming songs and poems, children create a mental picture, expanding the imagination.
  6. Because rhyming is fun, it adds joy to the sometimes daunting task of learning to read.]

http://www.themeasuredmom.com/why-is-rhyming-important/

Here  are some books that combine rhymes with fun stories and encourage children to predict the outcomes of the story:

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Baby Danced the Polka-Karen Beaumont, illustrated by Jennifer Plecas

This is such a perfect read aloud for the very young.  In this story of a baby who refuses to nap, Karen Beaumont skillfully uses rhyme to encourage children to guess the animals hiding under the flaps.

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Is Your Mama a Llama? by Deborah Gurarino, illustrated by Steven Kellogg

This book will conjure up memories of Dr. Seuss and P.D. Eastman, author of Are You My Mother?. as a young llama asked questions all the  animals nearby.  Children have the opportunity to use their rhyming skills to answer the questions.  This book will be quickly memorized.

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Mrs. Brown went to Town by Wong Herbert Yee

Mrs. Brown lives in the barn out back

With a cow, two pig, three ducks and a yak.

These animals are nothing but trouble for Mrs. Brown, but it’s clear, she loves them anyway.  Children will be too busy laughing at the silly antics of the animals to take this story seriously.

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Move Over Rover by Karen Beaumont, illustrated by Jane Dyer

Rover is sad and lonely until a thunderstorm arrives.  Suddenly all the animals are seeking shelter from the storm in his doghouse.  Children will enjoy chanting,  “Move Over Rover.”

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Good Rhymes Make Good Readers

Rhyming words are a key ingredient in helping children develop the skills they need for reading.  There is significant research that children well versed in rhyme have an easier time mastering reading.   http://www.bookstart.org.uk/professionals/about-bookstart-and-the-packs/research/reviews-and-resources/the-benefit-of-rhymes/

Here are a few of my  favorite rhyming books:

The Nonsense Show by Eric Carle    41n1rZGSsYL._SX393_BO1,204,203,200_

A new book by Eric Carle is always a treat.  Carle wanted to expose young children to surrealism.  The children may not care about that but they will love the silly rhymes and illustrations of birds swimming, fish flying and a boy in a kangaroo’s pouch.  Fan of Carle will notice that he recycles some of his illustrations from other books.

 

 

Louella Mae, She’s Run Away by Karen Beaumont Alarcon, illustrated by Roseanne Litzinger

51BVlF6vc0L._SX424_BO1,204,203,200_Louella Mae,  She’s run away!

Look in the cornfields!

Look in the hay!

Where, oh where is Louella Mae?

When Louella May runs away, the family goes on a frantic search to find her.  Rhyming words provide clues to the action on the next page.  Making predictions is also a key reading skill.  This is great to read aloud with a southern accent.

 

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Tumble Bumble by Felicia Bond

A tiny bug went for a walk.

He met a cat and stopped to talk.

They fell in step and strolled a while,

And bumped into a crocodile…

The bug, the cat and the crocodile continue to make new friends as they travel along and enjoy each other’s company.

 

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Shoe Baby by Joyce Dunbar, illustrated by Polly Dunbar,

A baby goes for an adventure in a flying shoe.  He goes to the sea, stops by the zoo, and meets the King and Queens

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Read Alouds for Early Grades

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Miss Nelson is Missing by Harry Allard, illustrations by James Marshall

The children love their teacher, Miss Nelson. When they start behaving badly, throwing spitballs in class and tossing paper airplanes, Miss Nelson fails to show up for school. She is replaced by the vile substitute teacher, Viola Swamp. Ms.Swamp wears an ugly black dress and makes the children’s life miserable.  Will they ever see Miss Nelson again?. Sequels include Miss Nelson is Back and Miss Nelson has a Field Day

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 Yertle the Turtle and Other Stories by Dr. Seuss

A turtle named Yertle is the ultimate bully:

“I’m Yertle the Turtle!

Oh Marvelous me!

For I am the ruler of all I can see.”

Yertle climbs to the top literally on the backs of all the turtles in the pond. But justice prevails.  Many people think Seuss based Yertle on Adolf Hitler.

 

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The Sneetches and Other Stories by Dr. Seuss

“Now the Star-Belly Sneetches  Had bellies with stars.

The Plain-Belly Sneetches had none up thars”

The Star Belly Sneetches consider themselves highly superior to the plain belly Sneetches .Then along comes Sylvester McMonkey McBean and his star creation machine.

Soon the Sneetches are adding and removing stars from their bellies until they are all totally confused.  Will the Sneetches learn their lesson?

 

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Random Readalouds for Preschoolers

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 This Book Just Ate My Dog by Richard Bryne

When Bella takes her dog for a walk, strange and unusual things happen. This is one of the best read aloud books ever.

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Duck on a Bike by David Shannon

When a duck decides to ride a bike, the barnyard animals have various reactions until they all have a chance to ride for themselves. Children love the silly illustrations.. The large pictures make this a good choice for a large group of children.

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The Super Hungry Dinosaur by Martin Waddell

Hal and his dog Billy save his family from the super hungry dinosaur. The dinosaur apologizes for his rude behavior and then stays for dinner.

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Lola at the Library-Anna McQuinn

Lola looks forward to Tuesday when she and her mom visit the library, attend story time, choose books and have a snack. The special day ends with a bedtime story.

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Toot and Puddle by Holly Hobbie.   Toot and Puddle live together in Woonsock Pocket.  Toot loves to travel but Puddle is a homebody.  Toot travels around the word sending postcards back to his best buddy.   They reunite in December when Toot return. This is the same Holly Hobbie of the bigheaded dolls but her pigs are infinitely cuter.  Don’t be surprised if you like this better than your children.  Try to avoid the cheaper knockoffs by National Geographic Press based on the TV show.  These are usually done by other authors.  National Geographic Press does an amazing job with nonfiction but these books are a poor imitation of Hobbie’s books.

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The Seals on the Bus by Lenny Hort, illustrated by Brian Karas

In this great sing along to the tune of The Wheels on the Bus,   Noisy animals board the bus.  All goes well until the skunks arrive.

 

 

 

 

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Make Reading Aloud Fun!

Learning to read can be tedious.  When some children are learning to decode words, they need a lot of practice. Listening can be a chore for mom or dad, especially if the text isn’t very interesting.  This is a sample of an early reading book  by Margaret Hillert.

Here is a little cowboy.

And here is a big cowboy.

Here is something for the little cowboy.

It can go.   It can run.  (snore)

Mary Ann Hoberman’s You Read to Me, I’ll Read to You Series can help take the drudgery out of reading practice.  These books are designed for children and adults to read together.  There’s lots of rhymes and funny dialogue.  Here is a short section from Very Tall Tales tountitled (2) Read Together:

Reader  1:  Annie Oakley, what a shot!

She could hit most any spot!

In a contest with a gun,

Bet your  britches, Annie  won!

 Reader 2:  When she was a little kid,

She learned shooting, Annie did.

Shot to keep her family fed,

“Had to do it.” Annie said.

Here are some other books in the same series:

These books are fun to read.  They share a lot of the silly poetry that children love.  They are likely to forget that this is reading practice.   Rhyming and repetition make for great phonics practice for beginning readers.

These books can be a challenge to locate at the library.  They have unusual call numbers. Some can be found in poetry (J 811.54) and some in folk tales. (J 398)  It’s better to request them online.

See more about Mary Ann Hoberman’s Series