1

More Rhyming Books

“The Measured Mom”    blog shares five ways that rhyming stories and songs benefit children.

  1. Rhyming teaches children how language works. It helps them notice and work with the sounds within words.
  2. Rhymes help children experience the rhythm of language.
  3. When children are familiar with a nursery rhyme or rhyming book, they learn to anticipate the rhyming word.  This prepares them to make predictions when they read, another important rhyming skill.
  4. It can help children understand that words that share common sounds often share common sounds with common letters.
  5. When listening to rhyming songs and poems, children create a mental picture, expanding the imagination.
  6. Because rhyming is fun, it adds joy to the sometimes daunting task of learning to read.]

http://www.themeasuredmom.com/why-is-rhyming-important/

Here  are some books that combine rhymes with fun stories and encourage children to predict the outcomes of the story:

61Ev3vl7lgL._SY491_BO1,204,203,200_

Baby Danced the Polka-Karen Beaumont, illustrated by Jennifer Plecas

This is such a perfect read aloud for the very young.  In this story of a baby who refuses to nap, Karen Beaumont skillfully uses rhyme to encourage children to guess the animals hiding under the flaps.

61AKNO9uX0L._SX373_BO1,204,203,200_

Is Your Mama a Llama? by Deborah Gurarino, illustrated by Steven Kellogg

This book will conjure up memories of Dr. Seuss and P.D. Eastman, author of Are You My Mother?. as a young llama asked questions all the  animals nearby.  Children have the opportunity to use their rhyming skills to answer the questions.  This book will be quickly memorized.

51J5E-EGMiL._SY490_BO1,204,203,200_

Mrs. Brown went to Town by Wong Herbert Yee

Mrs. Brown lives in the barn out back

With a cow, two pig, three ducks and a yak.

These animals are nothing but trouble for Mrs. Brown, but it’s clear, she loves them anyway.  Children will be too busy laughing at the silly antics of the animals to take this story seriously.

61STggbgE9L._SX408_BO1,204,203,200_

Move Over Rover by Karen Beaumont, illustrated by Jane Dyer

Rover is sad and lonely until a thunderstorm arrives.  Suddenly all the animals are seeking shelter from the storm in his doghouse.  Children will enjoy chanting,  “Move Over Rover.”

0

Getting Them Reading..

Some children take to books like ducks to water. Others need more encouragement.  Here are ways to encourage your child to read more…

Adult Reading

Be a role model.  Make time to read for your own enjoyment.  Last summer’s public library reading program included a program for adults.  Many people were eager to sign up their children but would cite excuses for themselves like “I don’t have time.” or “I am too busy reading to my children.”

 

untitled (6)

Limit screens.  I’m a lifelong bookworm and the Internet has impacted my reading time.  Time watching television or surfing the Internet is ultimately less satisfying than reading, playing  or creating.  Children need downtime.  It’s good for them to be bored sometimes.  If television and organized activities are always present, children lose the ability to create their own fun.  Unstructured play is crucial to healthy childhood development (but that’s another post.) Children are more likely to read when they have unscheduled time.

 

Use books to help children pursue their passions.  The DK readers feature many high interest topics with great pictures.  There are numerous Star Wars and Super Hero Books as well as books about natural disasters, sports and animals.

Boys often  prefer informational books to fiction.  Many of these boys are surrounded by females who tend to value fiction.. Be aware that the DK titles are more  difficult than the typical easy reader.  Visual appeal will attract reluctant readers.

.   Some children dislike reading because they are still struggling with decoding words. Being in touch with your child’s teacher is important.  But keep in mind that children do not all develop at the same rate.

If your child needs to practice reading, keep the sessions short.  In an earlier blog post, I recommended the You Read to Me, I Read to You books. These are set up as short poems for parents and child to read together.  Or just read some silly poetry together.    If your child is enjoying reading, they will make greater progress.   Reading aloud to children even after they become readers can reinforce their skills and show them the possibilities that reading can offer.

untitled (2)51S9rGYXtGL._SX401_BO1,204,203,200_

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gallery
1

Make Reading Aloud Fun!

Learning to read can be tedious.  When some children are learning to decode words, they need a lot of practice. Listening can be a chore for mom or dad, especially if the text isn’t very interesting.  This is a sample of an early reading book  by Margaret Hillert.

Here is a little cowboy.

And here is a big cowboy.

Here is something for the little cowboy.

It can go.   It can run.  (snore)

Mary Ann Hoberman’s You Read to Me, I’ll Read to You Series can help take the drudgery out of reading practice.  These books are designed for children and adults to read together.  There’s lots of rhymes and funny dialogue.  Here is a short section from Very Tall Tales tountitled (2) Read Together:

Reader  1:  Annie Oakley, what a shot!

She could hit most any spot!

In a contest with a gun,

Bet your  britches, Annie  won!

 Reader 2:  When she was a little kid,

She learned shooting, Annie did.

Shot to keep her family fed,

“Had to do it.” Annie said.

Here are some other books in the same series:

These books are fun to read.  They share a lot of the silly poetry that children love.  They are likely to forget that this is reading practice.   Rhyming and repetition make for great phonics practice for beginning readers.

These books can be a challenge to locate at the library.  They have unusual call numbers. Some can be found in poetry (J 811.54) and some in folk tales. (J 398)  It’s better to request them online.

See more about Mary Ann Hoberman’s Series

 

 

 

 

 

 

0

Beautiful Picture Books

I was recently disheartened at the books at the child development center.  The teachers’ books were unattractive and out of date.  The books the children were allowed to handle were mostly paperbacks with ripped pages and scribbles.

I returned after a visit to the public library with some beautiful books to share.  The teachers were apprehensive. I felt nervous too I but I decided that I could pay for one book.  Until then, I would let the children look at the books under my supervision. I told them that these books were special and must be handled with care.

Here are the books I chose:

515nMX9q0vL._SX457_BO1,204,203,200_

This is a wonderful concept book with so many things for children to enjoy. Fleming hides ladybugs throughout the book and the children loved finding them.  I enjoyed watching the children go through the book, naming the animals, colors, shapes, etc.  Earlier that week, I had listened to a teacher scold children for not knowing colors, and shapes, yet the children eagerly identified colors,.shapes and letters of the alphabet.

untitled

If you want to send preschoolers into a fit of giggles just mention underwear. This book combines a silly story with lots of counting and rhymes.   All of the animals have one thing in common: they hate to share. The comical pictures of bears sharing underwear and skating ducks with sticks and pucks are delightful. Learning to recognize rhyming patterns is a great pre-reading skill. Without realizing it, they are beginning to recognize syllables and parts of words.   The children spent a lot of time counting and identifying objects.

51ARUtiAdDL._SX424_BO1,204,203,200_

This book involves the children in a two-part guessing game. First they identify the color from a small circular opening on the page. They are also told one important fact about the animal. (i.e. I have a large trunk) Even after seeing the full spread, some animals like the Orangutan will be unfamiliar to  children. This is a great book for reading aloud. It’s also a great way of introducing children to beautiful art.  The children enjoyed guessing which animal would emerge on the next page.

516k3vDR4iL._SX452_BO1,204,203,200_

The pictures in this book are amazing! The cover focuses on his large protruding teeth. There is a picture of a hippo devouring a crocodile in one bite. Almost every child reacted to the page where hippos stand rump to rump and throw dung at each other. This book has a broad appeal. The more general facts are in bold with smaller sections that give more information for older children.

 

The preschoolers loved51JP+4DUDaL._SX383_BO1,204,203,200_ browsing this  book about four mice brothers: Rick, Mick, Vick and Nick. Each wears a different color shirt, choses a different food and has a unique dream. Only little Nick must find his own way to shine-shades of Leo the Late Bloomer by Leo Lionni.  This book was a little long to be read aloud to preschoolers but they enjoyed the colorful pictures.

No children’s books were harmed in this endeavor